Is it live or is it Milli Vanilli?

Is it live or is it Milli Vanilli?

Are you a music fan?

If so, have you ever paid top dollar to attend a live performance from your favorite artist, only to later discover that live performance may not have been well, live?

Did you become angry, or like most, were you merely happy to have been entertained?

What if, to confound matters, you were to learn your favorite popular music recording artist wasn’t who they claimed to be?

While your contemplating, how does this play into the larger question of the simulated nature of the actor based reality and, are there larger implications at play – is humanity being conditioned to accept, and even prefer the presence of a simulated reality in lieu of what is perceived to be organic?

To many throughout the generations, pop culture and pop music have come to represent insatiable opiates. Though many would no doubt dismiss the very notion, pop music stars and pop culture icons have also come to represent sacred images, similar to the high esteem once held toward cherished religious relics of ages past.

Indeed, it remains difficult for many to find fault with any of their chosen pop culture icons, even when they are confronted with the awful truth while their majestic emperors stand before them, unceremoniously disrobed.

This psychological phenomenon deliberately exploits the primal urge to imagine that one can become part of something larger than oneself, even if that primal connection exists as a simulated substitute for genuine human intimacy.

However, further and more penetrating analysis of that phenomenon one fears, at least for now, would be venturing too far afield and perhaps beyond the intended scope of this installment.

Nevertheless, loyal readers shall soon learn, the phenomenon of lip syncing associated with the world of pop and even rock music has become virtually all-pervasive.

No folks, lip syncing isn’t just for the likes of Milli Vanilli or Madonna anymore.

However, don’t be dismayed, for loyal readers should be content to learn this installment does not intend to primarily concern itself with merely an analysis of this music industry phenomenon.

The fact is, folks, the phenomenon of performance miming or as it is more popularly known, lip syncing, has existed for decades, long before Milli Vanilli, Madonna, and hosts of other popular artists had been cited as guilty practitioners.

In fact, after briefly dispensing with the lip syncing phenomenon and why it continues to be so prevalent, one shall proceed to definitively identify a pair of popular music recording artists who have successfully portrayed multiple pop music icons over a period of decades.

One of these is a well-respected guitarist and former member of a high-profile pop act who, as it turns out, also has a connection with the Charles Manson simulated serial murder hoax of the 1960’s.

Continue reading “Is it live or is it Milli Vanilli?”

Unholy trinity: sex, drugs, and rock and roll (part III)

Unholy trinity: sex, drugs, and rock and roll (part III)

There is no doubt the following shall rankle the emotional sensibilities of classic rock fans everywhere.

So be it.

But it is those deeply embedded emotional sensibilities that always serve to preclude a more sober, objective, and even detailed analysis of the perception of reality manufactured and sold to the public through the spectacle of professional entertainments. As indicated in the last installment of this ongoing series of articles, the true nature of the pop music industry does not at all resemble the general public’s misinformed impressions.

Much like narcotics addicts, most rabid fans of popular music merely crave their emotional hit – in depth analysis be damned. Caught up in the glittering spectacle of light and sound, critical thinking is an afterthought, if not wholly sacrificed. Reason is often a foreign concept to fanatics. Many fail to realize the music business is not predicated on merit or talent index, but nepotism, and many of those stars idolized and even worshiped are often found portraying the role of more than one celebrity personality. The wholesale monopolization of an entire industry by an elite group of ruling families allows for such a practice to not only exist, but persist.

This installment shall deal with one of classic rock’s most iconic performers, a performer who during the heyday of their career was idolized and worshiped as New Jersey’s favorite son.

But, it was all a lie.

And no folks, we’re not talking about Bruce ‘the boss’ Springsteen.  Continue reading “Unholy trinity: sex, drugs, and rock and roll (part III)”