History’s story of “Honest Abe” fiction? (part II)

History’s story of “Honest Abe” fiction? (part II)

Rewriting history may seem like a rather quixotic notion.

After all, one doesn’t lack understanding as to why creating such blatant contradictions to that body of historical knowledge in which generations of American public school students have been psychologically conditioned to unquestioningly believe, would largely be perceived as foolhardy, perhaps even absurd.

Or – does applying critical thought and analysis in questioning the bedrock tenets of American history seem absurd only because its veracity has largely been held on purely faith alone?

Is it that the myth of America’s sixteenth president, Abraham Lincoln, seems so seductively indelible only because – rather than reflecting a truthful and verifiable historical account –  the historical narrative associated with that particular historical figure was designed to reflect and even exalt those higher virtues the American nation would like to believe it inherently embodies?

The obvious question remains: how can such mythical historical narratives, based wholly upon lies, withstand truth’s penetrating probe of critical analysis?

The answer: they can’t and they won’t.

That is why critical thought and analysis regarding America’s historical narratives are eschewed and even scorned by the social conditioning and indoctrination methods that have been assiduously utilized on generations of American public school students.

Therefore, as loyal readers shall soon discover, when put to any modicum of critical analysis, the alleged assassination of Abraham Lincoln represents a fraudulent historical narrative that was designed to create the indelible image of a mythical and heroic martyr, rather than an accurate, verifiable and chronological portrayal of an historical event capable of withstanding analytical scrutiny. Continue reading “History’s story of “Honest Abe” fiction? (part II)”